Gross Alpha
Gross Beta
Iodine-131
Iodine-129
Cesium-137
Cobalt-60
Strontium-90
Plutonium-238
Plutonium-239/240
Tritium
Americium-241
Particulate Matter
Ionizing Radiation
Technetium-99
Neptunium-237
Heavy Metals
Volatile Organics

What are the sources of Particulate Matter?

Particulate matter comes from a number of sources. Generally, any activity which involves burning of materials or any dust generating activities are sources of PM. Along with the examples listed above, PM can come from fireplaces and cars driving on unpaved roads as well as the smoke from large industrial plants. 

How Does PM Affect Me?

Particulate matter is present in many different sizes. Large particles mainly come from the soil and smaller particles come from the burning of fossil fuels, like gasoline in cars and the coal used at power plants. The smaller the particle, the more dangerous, because it can travel deeper into the lungs. When particulate matter is breathed in, it can irritate and damage the lungs, causing breathing problems. People who have asthma or some type of lung or heart disease are directly impacted by high levels of PM. The elderly and children are also especially vulnerable to the effects of PM. 

Many studies have shown links between PM and health effects. Increases in PM have been linked to decreases in lung function, increases in breathing problems and hospitalization, and early death.